People

Profs

Luke Waltzer

I am the Assistant Director for Educational Technology at the Bernard L. Schwartz Communication Institute at Baruch College. I run Blogs@Baruch, oversee Cac.ophony.org, contribute to the management of VOCAT, and advise the staff of the Institute and members of the Baruch community on the integration of technology into their work. I also serve as the Community Advisor to the CUNY Academic Commons and on the editorial board of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. I’ve published essays in Matt Gold’s Debates in the Digital Humanities and, with my colleague Thomas Harbison, in Writing History in the Digital Age, and I’ve been known to blog (on occasion) at http://lukewaltzer.com. I hold a Ph.D. in History from the Graduate Center, where I wrote a non-digital dissertation about American adolescence in the two decades after World War II. I live in New Jersey with my wife and two kids, and spend my weekends cooking, watching basketball, coaching soccer, and catching up on RSS feeds.

Chris Stein

I teach full-time as an Associate Professor in the Media Arts & Technology department at BMCC. Most of my classes have to do with front-end web development (if you don’t know what that means, ask me). I am also the Director of User Experience (UX for the cool kids) for the CUNY Academic Commons, which you may have noticed you’re using right now. If you would like to share any of your thoughts on your experience as a user, positive or negative, I’d love to hear what you have to say.

In other, more important roles, I’m a family man, hobbyist photographer, sometimes Web Developer, once-was soccer player and music enthusiast.

Like the plumber with leaky pipes at home or the alcoholic doctor I don’t currently have a real web site of my own, but here are some links:
http://cuny.is/cstein
http://www.youtube.com/user/profstein
https://foundphotos.commons.gc.cuny.edu/

 

Students

Anderson Evans

I am a MALS student taking time off of work this semester to move forward on some personal projects. I run a literary blog called SAGATROPE and I am in the early processes of putting together some manuals for people interested in OnDemand print publishing at WeekendPublisher.com.

In the past I have worked for Gawker Media (some of my better performing posts for Gawker were LOST: Choose Your Own AdventureSuperman: What the Hell Happened to The Man of Tomorrow, and The Week Late Night Went to War), I’ve worked as Video Editor for The Daily Beast, and as a Production Coordinator for The Webby Awards in 2011, and recently resigned my post at the Brooklyn Public Library running their Espresso Book Machine for OnDemandBooks.

I also author/draw/self-publish a comic book called “Babe Quest.”

Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land

I am a PhD student in the sociology department, an adjunct at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and a Digital Fellow with the JustPublics@365 initiative. I am studying (critical) criminology. My research explores how the politics of crime and punishment play out in left-wing/social democratic governments (in the UK and Canada), and about the ways a settler-colonial context shapes the discourse about crime (mostly in Canada). In Canada (my hometown), I’ve been involved in Copwatch, have written for Canadian Dimension Magazine about issues related to criminalization, and have published about “community-based” responses to crime.

My interest in digital technologies comes from a desire to bring my academic research, pedagogy, and social justice work in closer connection with each other. I want to learn all the ways I can collect/capture people’s feelings and narratives about crime and criminalization, illustrate/present them in ways that situates them in particular times and spaces, and etch away at the discourses of managerial techno-science that dominate (North American) criminology!My own webpage is very underdeveloped. I am officially taking suggestions about how to get myself to pay attention to it.

Philip Kreniske

I’m currently a Developmental Psychology Ph.D. student and a Graduate Teaching Fellow at Hunter. My interest in psychology stems from five years teaching in high needs public schools in San Francisco and New York. In addition, I taught English and conducted pilot research in the San village of Tsumkwe, Namibia (A friend blogged about some of our experiences here ). And you can find my short report about the educational situation in the area if you search my name at http://kalaharipeoples.net/. My recent work focuses on the intersection of technology and education with a particular emphasis on narrative writing in digital contexts. I’m also the student coordinator for the Center for the Humanities Narrating Change seminar where I run our fledgling blog Narrating Change .

and my superbasic site…

Please add a comment below to introduce yourself and add any links to any personal web sites or online accounts you feel are appropriate.

10 thoughts on “People

  1. Anderson Evans

    I am a MALS student taking time off of work this semester to move forward on some personal projects. I run a literary blog called SAGATROPE and I am in the early processes of putting together some manuals for people interested in OnDemand print publishing at WeekendPublisher.com.

    In the past I have worked for Gawker Media (some of my better performing posts for Gawker were LOST: Choose Your Own Adventure, Superman: What the Hell Happened to The Man of Tomorrow, and The Week Late Night Went to War), I’ve worked as Video Editor for The Daily Beast, and as a Production Coordinator for The Webby Awards in 2011, and recently resigned my post at the Brooklyn Public Library running their Espresso Book Machine for OnDemandBooks.

    I also author/draw/self-publish a comic book called “Babe Quest.”

    Reply
  2. Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land

    I am a PhD student in the sociology department, an adjunct at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and a Digital Fellow with the JustPublics@365 initiative. I am studying (critical) criminology. My research explores how the politics of crime and punishment play out in left-wing/social democratic governments (in the UK and Canada), and about the ways a settler-colonial context shapes the discourse about crime (mostly in Canada). In Canada (my hometown), I’ve been involved in Copwatch, have written for Canadian Dimension Magazine about issues related to criminalization, and have published about “community-based” responses to crime.

    My interest in digital technologies comes from a desire to bring my academic research, pedagogy, and social justice work in closer connection with each other. I want to learn all the ways I can collect/capture people’s feelings and narratives about crime and criminalization, illustrate/present them in ways that situates them in particular times and spaces, and etch away at the discourses of managerial techno-science that dominate (North American) criminology! 🙂 🙂

    My own webpage is very underdeveloped. I am officially taking suggestions about how to get myself to pay attention to it.

    Reply
  3. Profile photo of PhilipPhilip

    I’m currently a Developmental Psychology Ph.D. student and a Graduate Teaching Fellow at Hunter. My interest in psychology stems from five years teaching in high needs public schools in San Francisco and New York. In addition, I taught English and conducted pilot research in the San village of Tsumkwe, Namibia (A friend blogged about some of our experiences here ). And you can find my short report about the educational situation in the area if you search my name at http://kalaharipeoples.net/. My recent work focuses on the intersection of technology and education with a particular emphasis on narrative writing in digital contexts. I’m also the student coordinator for the Center for the Humanities Narrating Change seminar where I run our fledgling blog Narrating Change .

    and my superbasic site…

    Reply
  4. Profile photo of Benjamin HaberBenjamin Haber

    I’m a PhD student in the sociology department and a Graduate Teaching Fellow at Hunter College. I have dabbler tendencies and my diffuse academic interests include affect, bodies, cities, technology (of course) and novel and interesting approaches to method and measure in the social sciences. Currently I’m working on a paper with some folks on the epistemological and ontological transformations of what has become known as “big data” and I’m co-chair of The Life of Things seminar at the Center for the Humanities, which is exploring similar questions.

    I also (with decreasing frequency) throw these immersive, installation-based events with the queer party collective Judy. We’ve raised money for a number of different social justice organizations and art projects and in 2011 we actually received the Museum of Art and Design’s first Fellowship in the Social Practice of Nightlife.

    Reply
  5. Profile photo of Jennifer StoopsJennifer Stoops

    I am a second year PhD student in the Urban Education program. My academic interests are diverse: issues of privatization in public spaces; decay and melancholia in institutions; alternate structures of public schooling; media literacy; community building and activism related to school closings and restructuring; and theoretical questions on the commons and networks. As the social media fellow for my department, I tweet @UrbanEdCUNY. To confuse myself, I also have a personal Twitter account @jen_stoops that I largely neglect. I serve on the editorial board of the Urban Ed online journal TRAUE & on the department’s executive committee.
    Prior to embarking on doctoral work, I taught ELA to 7th and 8th graders. My favorite experiences working with middle school students include reading and teaching YAL (young adolescent literature: especially work by Sherman Alexie, Suzanne Collins, Nancy Farmer, Dream Jordan, and Gene Yuen Lang); organizing a manga/anime and comics club; and critically viewing Internet memes, Nicki Minaj videos, and advertisements.
    Like Bronwyn (and probably many of my fellow ITPers), my interest in digital technologies stems from a desire to blend my social, economic, and educational justice concerns together in novel and accessible ways. This semester, I am taking part in the GC’s ambitious POOC to get a better grasp on critical participatory action research, notions of community, and digital tools.

    Reply
  6. Profile photo of Michelle A. McSweeney (Johnson)Michelle A. McSweeney (Johnson)

    I’m working on a PhD in Linguistics and am interested in the way Long Term English Language Learners use English in various ways and the difference between digital literacy and social media literacy. I hypothesize that digital literacy is similar to knowledge of a language whereas social media literacy is more similar to the knowledge needed for communication. During my first 2 years at CUNY, I was researching the syntax and semantics of Eastern Bantu languages as a route to preservation. Both of these interests were sparked when I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uganda and became deeply interested in Linguistic Human Rights (the right to use one’s native language).

    Like many others, my interest in digital technology stems from a desire to create a public product that can engage with a broader audience than typical academic research and thereby have a social and political impact.

    For more about my research interests or teaching, click here

    Reply
  7. Profile photo of Erin GlassErin Glass

    for starters, i am a second year phd student in the english department and also a digital fellow. before coming to the graduate center i worked in journalism & then later, in organic farming. i am hoping tis not a serious crime to mash up previous introductory writing: like many, my relationship towards digital technology has been one of both great anxiety and great excitement. after my own attempt at rejecting all its goods (an old job had burnt me on the internet and the strange frazzled string – i feared — it was making out of my mind), i realized such luddite extremism was not only impractical and personally-detrimental, but was justified — at least for me — on assumptions that made little sense.

    thus my new challenge became not fighting the tide of digital technology from a little off-the-grid hut in upstate new york, but trying to make sense of it and figure out the best practices for living, learning and making community under its powerful sway. in general, i’m interested in science and technology studies, and in particular, how technology subtly shapes tastes, values and ideologies. once i figure all this out, i will probably go back to reading poetry. i feel more comfortable in lower case, which the internet tacitly approves.

    Reply

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